Category: CJJ12

Still photos in the age of the video

Can photojournalism stay relevant? In the darkened highway illuminated by the headlights of cars, a bystander was quietly documenting on his smartphone two young men confronting each other over a…

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Can photojournalism stay relevant?

In the darkened highway illuminated by the headlights of cars, a bystander was quietly documenting on his smartphone two young men confronting each other over a traffic issue. After some heated exchange of words, one took a gun and fired at the other person. Pandemonium ensued. In a matter of seconds, the video was downloaded on Facebook. And before the night was over, the video had gone viral.

Welcome to the brave new world of instantaneous sharing of information! And as a photographer, you can’t help but ask, can photography keep pace with the new media world order?

Photography, as we knew it, has recently gone through a dramatic and decidedly major makeover. The shift from film to digital is earth-shaking. The transition is ushered in by the entry of a brand-new technology which redefined how photographs are produced and shared. The new technology attracted a younger and more numerous band of practitioners who are in a mad dash to take over the castle. As in any revolution, there are casualties. Kodak, the iconic company whose name is synonymous to photography, is its biggest victim. Then there are the smaller and largely unaccounted photo entities that folded shop. And in the vast wasteland are older photographers who stubbornly refuse to follow the beat of the new drum, preferring to stick around in the old terminal and dreaming of the past. Continue Reading

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Of readership and citizenship: A library’s tale

When I heard about the Cebu Citizens-Press Council’s (CCPC) call for book donations for its Cebu Journalism and Journalists (CJJ) Book project, I thought how history has a way of…

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When I heard about the Cebu Citizens-Press Council’s (CCPC) call for book donations for its Cebu Journalism and Journalists (CJJ) Book project, I thought how history has a way of coming full circle.

During the 45th quarterly meeting of the CCPC on Dec. 1, 2016, the country’s longest active citizens-press council entered into a memorandum of agreement with the Cebu City Public Library (CCPL) to gather journalism books and related materials for a nook at the library, located at the ground floor of the Rizal Memorial Library and Museum.

Book shelves were donated to the CCPL, including 230 books on journalism coming from SunStar Cebu and its public and standards editor Pachico A. Seares, who is also the CCPC executive director. Continue Reading

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Cebu Citizens-Press Council: Reaching out

We do a lot of consulting. Before CCPC speaks out. Consultation is the core of CCPC’s work: as forum for media issues, platform for grievance, advocate of free speech and…

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We do a lot of consulting. Before CCPC speaks out.

Consultation is the core of CCPC’s work: as forum for media issues, platform for grievance, advocate of free speech and free press, and catalyst for journalists’ welfare.

The Cebu press doesn’t isolate itself within its media platforms. With its citizen partners, the press reaches out and listens. Person-to-person, up close, in forums outside of the newspaper or broadcast station and its vehicle. Continue Reading

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Frontliners: what sometimes happen behind the scene

On the scene reporters descend, piecing together narratives for their audiences like clockwork. Except there is nothing regular at all about the job of reporting the news. Unfamiliar territory, jargon,…

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On the scene reporters descend, piecing together narratives for their audiences like clockwork. Except there is nothing regular at all about the job of reporting the news. Unfamiliar territory, jargon, security threats, disturbing vistas—here’s a behind-the-scenes look at the challenges news gatherers face. Continue Reading

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Cebu Press Freedom Week timeline

The celebration of Cebu Press Freedom Week aims to remind the public and the press that the freedom they enjoy must be protected from all threats. The celebration brings together…

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The celebration of Cebu Press Freedom Week aims to remind the public and the press that the freedom they enjoy must be protected from all threats. The celebration brings together not just Cebu journalists but also members of the public invited to activities that range from forums and training sessions to photo exhibits and fellowship.

The Cebu Press Freedom Week Inc. board of trustees lays down the policies on the management of the weeklong celebration. Continue Reading

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New bosses in the newsroom

No day off, reporting in three languages—these new leaders of the newsroom meet challenges head on while keeping the troops happy and in line. Still “one of the boys,” but…

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No day off, reporting in three languages—these new leaders of the newsroom meet challenges head on while keeping the troops happy and in line. Still “one of the boys,” but they now make the rules.

Archie Mangubat Modequillo

The Freeman editor-in-chief Archie M. Modequillo considers the readers’ shift toward social media as the paper’s biggest challenge. He wants a change in the paper’s culture to rise to the new challenge, and is confident this can be achieved with everyone’s cooperation in “improving content and adapting new technologies—even if slowly but consistently.”

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Jess Vestil: ‘Renaissance man’

Journalist, publicist, advertising executive—Jess Perez Vestil was all that. Plus teacher, actor and poet besides. Vestil’s love for his mother language and country gave birth to “Yutang Tabunon,” the Cebuano…

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Journalist, publicist, advertising executive—Jess Perez Vestil was all that. Plus teacher, actor and poet besides.

Vestil’s love for his mother language and country gave birth to “Yutang Tabunon,” the Cebuano translation of the Philippine national anthem.

The late multi-talented journalist answered the call of then Cebu Gov. Emilio Osmeña, who sought the Cebuano version of “Lupang Hinirang.” Continue Reading

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What may kill a media forum

The 888 Forum may be the only media forum of its genre that has survived in Cebu. Notable forums in the past included: — “Meet the Press” of Cebu Press…

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The 888 Forum may be the only media forum of its genre that has survived in Cebu. Notable forums in the past included:

— “Meet the Press” of Cebu Press Club and, later, Association of Cebu Journalists (during lunch and on TV);

— Lunch with Sun.Star, though limited to Sun.Star journalists;

— “Kapihan sa Sugbo” of Sukna, an association of mostly broadcast commentators.

Many reporters prefer to work separately, not with the herd. But a media forum, or similarly a press-con, can provide the clue or lead to a big story. If a media forum fails to provide even that, reporters stay away, as they shun an empty well. Continue Reading

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CEBU DECLARATION

A Call to Action for the Protection of Journalists in the Philippines Marcelo B. Fernan Cebu Press Center, Cebu City, Philippines 23 November 2010 Preamble: In a democracy like the…

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A Call to Action for the Protection of Journalists in the Philippines

Marcelo B. Fernan Cebu Press Center, Cebu City, Philippines
23 November 2010

Preamble:
In a democracy like the Philippines, the people have the right to information so they can participate wisely in governance. It is the role and the duty of the press or the mass media to provide accurate information to the people so that the latter can make better decisions. But in order to perform that duty, the press must be free and responsible. We note however that in the Philippines the press has been hampered in the performance of this duty because of the killings of journalists.

We, the 104 delegates to the 1st Media Conference on the Protection of Journalists, in commemoration of the first anniversary of the Maguindanao Massacre, lament the unsolved killings of more than 130 journalists and media workers while performing their duties in the Philippines between 1986 and 2010. Continue Reading

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Killing Journalists: When law and order and justice system fail

But media shares burden of reducing risk to safety of its practitioners Since Nov. 23, 2009, the Ampatuan Massacre trial has moved oh so slowly, stuck in the mire of…

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But media shares burden of reducing risk to safety of its practitioners

Since Nov. 23, 2009, the Ampatuan Massacre trial has moved oh so slowly, stuck in the mire of simultaneous hearings on petitions for bail filed by 58 of the 197 accused.

Five years ago on that day, 32 journalists and media workers, along with 26 other men and women, died in the worst single political killing in the country since the Edsa Revolution of 1986.

While 197 were charged with 57 counts of murder, only 98 are detained; the rest are still at large. Petitions for bail, in which the state must present “strong evidence of guilt,” have made the process crawl, nowhere near the line when the main trial could start. Continue Reading

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