Category: CJJ13

What kind of content will work? A UP forum kicks the idea around

What kind of content works? A panel of UP graduates kicks around ideas for print media It has been some time since observers within the industry and academia noticed that…

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What kind of content works? A panel of UP graduates kicks around ideas for print media

It has been some time since observers within the industry and academia noticed that journalism is facing a crisis.

Solutions have been proposed. But will change in content, particularly in print media, work?

In September 2018, as the Cebu Press Freedom Week celebration was coming to a close, editor-turned university lecturer Jason Baguia sat down with a group of young University of the Philippines graduates from different parts of the country to discuss the matter. Continue Reading

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Remember the newsboys? They may have been forgotten in the age of digital media

Painfully absent in the conversation about how newspapers are transitioning to digital and the evolution of the next printed media product is the erstwhile loud voice of newsboys selling the…

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Painfully absent in the conversation about how newspapers are transitioning to digital and the evolution of the next printed media product is the erstwhile loud voice of newsboys selling the morning edition.

“Mura’g wala nama’y nahinumdom namo (We seem to have been forgotten)” says Francisco Enghug, 47, amid declining newspaper sales in the age of social media and the Internet. “Wa ko kadungog nga dunay gi (I haven’t heard of anyone calling for a) meeting para (for a) solution.”

But media bosses do see a future for the print media industry — one where a re-imagined paper, containing more detailed narratives and catering to a more demanding readership — goes hand-in-hand with news online and in social media. Continue Reading

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The impact of new media on newspaper circulation in selected countries

By Tessa Aguilar In nine countries covered by a study, print media show how to beat the crisis High internet penetration, which makes it easy for the public to get…

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By Tessa Aguilar

In nine countries covered by a study, print media show how to beat the crisis

High internet penetration, which makes it easy for the public to get their news from the web, won’t necessarily cause newspaper circulation to decline.

A common strategy: redesign story-telling based on preferences of readers

This is at least true in nine countries — Australia, Canada, Czech Republic, Finland, Ireland, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore and South Africa — which became the focus of a data-mining and cluster analysis study by a group of college students.

Newspapers here may need to “redesign story telling style based on the preference of the readers” though, said Tessa Frances Aguilar, Christine Dianne, Balansag, Marichu Canencia and Milva Villocero in their paper.

That and continue to raise its online advertising revenues. Continue Reading

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The hard-hitting radio commentators

Is bombast gone? And do they need to look good on screen too? Bombast and other techniques in the old days of broadcasting are undergoing changes. New technology allows the radio…

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Is bombast gone? And do they need to look good on screen too?

Bombast and other techniques in the old days of broadcasting are undergoing changes. New technology allows the radio talk show host not just to be heard but also seen. And engagement with the audience is speedier though there’s less voiced reaction from listeners.

The more telling change in the way radio commentaries are delivered these days is that talk show hosts are not just heard, they’re seen.

But then, in the late eighties going into the nineties, the requirement of voice quality was downgraded too. That was a big change in standards.

Voice timber and diction became less important than capacity to tackle public issues, along with the personality’s overall power to draw the audience.

Some of today’s top radio commentators benefited from devaluation of voice as factor for hiring. Many of them don’t have “the announcer’s voice” prized in the early days of radio. Continue Reading

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Cebu’s top talk show hosts on style, other changes

The raised voice, the fury: Nalzaro is still at it although, he says, his thrust is issue-based, not personality directed. Bañoc thinks the practice has long been abandoned, “if indeed…

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The raised voice, the fury: Nalzaro is still at it although, he says, his thrust is issue-based, not personality directed. Bañoc thinks the practice has long been abandoned, “if indeed it existed.”

Radio commentators are soldiers of the airwaves.

They come armed with opinions and ideas, and their mission is, with voices modulated or not, to infiltrate minds and hearts, and provoke thought on issues of the day.

When successful, their commentaries spark a revolution in the consciousness of listeners and foment in them ideas that depose the empire of apathy.  

To the actual subject of commentary — wayward public servants and others — a broadcaster’s words are bullets that wound the ego. “Toytoy,” “hanggaw,” “kuwanggol” and “amaw” are potent Cebuano adjectives, verbal bombs that form part of a wider arsenal of dark humor.  

But colonizers of the minds and emotions radio commentators are not. Their primary role is to present truths framed on their observation and insight of the current state of affairs.

The ultimate decision on whether to believe the commentator falls on the listener. Continue Reading

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Radio reaches 94% of Metro Cebu

The survey that reports to the Kapisanan ng mga Brodkaster ng Pilipinas claims a radio audience of 1.3 million Cebuanos. Stations dyHP and dySS for AM radio stations and dyWF…

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The survey that reports to the Kapisanan ng mga Brodkaster ng Pilipinas claims a radio audience of 1.3 million Cebuanos. Stations dyHP and dySS for AM radio stations and dyWF and dyRT on the FM band, Kantar Media says, top in audience share. Kantar Media figures give the image of a lopsided competition with one radio station leading the race by miles.

Radio still has a powerful hold on Metro Cebu listeners, a media survey covering the second quarter of 2018 shows.

Kantar Media, in a report to the Kapisanan ng mga Brodkaster ng Pilipinas (KBP), said radio programs in both AM and FM bands reach 94 percent of their sample population of 250 Metro Cebu households every week.

This, based on their computation, represents 1.3 million actual Cebuanos.

The study, commissioned by the Kapisanan ng mga Brodkaster ng Pilipinas (KBP) and carried out from June 21 to 27, 2018 also showed that individuals in Metro Cebu spend an average of three hours a day listening to their favorite programs.

While the version of the Kantar report given to the media does not establish what type of programming  is popular, it does indicate that radio is the foremost mode of information and entertainment for audiences classified as D and E. Continue Reading

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