Category: CJJ8

Authors (not) Anonymous

Technology helps unmask Web miscreants How are people held accountable for what they say in digital media? Traditional journalists working for newspapers, radio or TV can be sued for libel…

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Technology helps unmask Web miscreants

How are people held accountable for what they say in digital media?

Traditional journalists working for newspapers, radio or TV can be sued for libel and are easily identifiable. They are also employed by registered organizations that you can complain to when you have issues with their work.

In digital media, however, it is harder. The decentralized design of the Internet enables anonymity and false identities, which can make it difficult to go after people.

But while it is easy to think you are anonymous online, you’re actually not. Your Internet-connected devices—laptops, phones and tablets—are snitches that leave a digital trail that can be followed. You can be traced via your device’s Internet Protocol (IP) address, a series of numbers that uniquely identifies your gadget in the network, with the help of service providers and tech experts. Victims of online abuse can file complaints with the website and work with authorities to unmask these people. Continue Reading

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NEWSROOM TALES

Ecleo, no! Told about a planned police operation against fugitive Ruben Ecleo Jr. who faces two arrest warrants, a news editor asked the chief photographer to assign a photographer to…

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Ecleo, no!

Told about a planned police operation against fugitive Ruben Ecleo Jr. who faces two arrest warrants, a news editor asked the chief photographer to assign a photographer to accompany a reporter who’d cover it.

Ecleo, supreme master of the Philippine Benevolent Missionaries Association and former congressman, was convicted in the murder of his wife Alona Bacolod-Ecleo and on two counts of corruption. Ten years earlier, on his first arrest, a gunfight claimed 20 lives when police descended on his hometown in Dinagat Island, Surigao.

The photo chief asked the photographer if he’d cover the planned new raid. He refused so the chief turned to other photographers. Continue Reading

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The Advocate

  When it started in 2005, the Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC) had modest goals of discussing media issues and providing a local grievance mechanism for offended news sources. But many…

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When it started in 2005, the Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC) had modest goals of discussing media issues and providing a local grievance mechanism for offended news sources.

But many projects and scars in the fight for press freedom and responsibility later, its outsize impact has earned it a seat in discussions on the formation of a transnational press body.

In Bangkok last May 24, CCPC represented the Philippines in a meeting with national press council delegates from Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam to study the creation of an Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) Press Council that will apply for stakeholder status in the Asean Secretariat.

CCPC, advocate of a free press, is no stranger to conversations. Over the years, it has used conversations to advance its relations with stakeholders and improve journalism standards and reporting. Continue Reading

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Cornelio Faigao and the ‘Canto Voice’

By Erma M. Cuizon Cornelio Festin Faigao’s column in canto verses daily depicted the culture and the politics in Cebu in the ‘40s and ‘50s, touching on topics mundane and…

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By Erma M. Cuizon

Cornelio Festin Faigao’s column in canto verses daily depicted the culture and the politics in Cebu in the ‘40s and ‘50s, touching on topics mundane and great, from junkets to pork barrel spending. Cebu journalist Faigao’s column “Canto Voice” opened the morning to Cebuano readers of the Pioneer Press from the late 1940s, later of an independent paper he put up and edited in the late ‘50s, The Southern Star.

In the ‘50s, “Canto Voice” also appeared in the Morning Times, Cebu Daily News (not today’s CDN) and The Republic Daily. Continue Reading

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Flame keepers

Argao streets named after journalists Three Cebuanos who left their mark on journalism will be remembered long after their bylines shook up the community they reported for. The late journalists…

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Clod K. Bajenting, Wilfredo A. Veloso, and Cerge M. Remonde

Argao streets named after journalists

Three Cebuanos who left their mark on journalism will be remembered long after their bylines shook up the community they reported for.

The late journalists Cerge M. Remonde, Wilfredo A. Veloso and Clod K. Bajenting will be honored by their hometown Argao with a street each named after them. Continue Reading

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Press behind bars: Journalists remember martial law

To generations used to the marketplace exchange of information in this digital age, martial law represents the country’s excursion into the alien and bizarre. Information was not for everyone. Truth…

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Juan L. Mercado

To generations used to the marketplace exchange of information in this digital age, martial law represents the country’s excursion into the alien and bizarre.

Information was not for everyone. Truth could be subverted for a higher good, like security or survival. Journalists, who did not sieve information with the sensitivity of the state, had to be muzzled before they could do more harm.
Information, lives—like scraps of paper, these were lost in the bureaucracy created to hold up one man’s rule.

Juan L. Mercado and Dr. Resil B. Mojares were among those who were “neutralized” or “invited”—euphemisms for the directive to military intelligence agents to take into custody political and non-political leaders after President Ferdinand E. Marcos signed Proclamation 1081 on Sept. 21, 1972, which placed the country under martial law (ML). Continue Reading

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‘Magellan’s PR guy’

By Januar E. Yap Domingo M. Estabaya’s colleagues in the newsroom would tease him for his frequent writings on the Portuguese explorer, but there was more to the tag that…

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By Januar E. Yap

Domingo M. Estabaya’s colleagues in the newsroom would tease him for his frequent writings on the Portuguese explorer, but there was more to the tag that speaks about him.

“He had a yen for facts, information,” said Godofredo Roperos, who was then literary editor for Bisaya magazine, where Estabaya contributed his articles in Cebuano. “He must’ve acquired it along the way as a journalist.”

From the 1960s to the 1970s, Estabaya submitted stories on Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan and local chieftain Lapu-Lapu to publications like Graphic Magazine, Philippine Panorama, The Weekly Nation, Philippines Free Press and The Freeman Magazine. Continue Reading

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How are newspapers surviving in the digital age?

By Eileen G. Mangubat These remarks were first delivered during the 17th National Press Forum of the Philippine Press Institute at the New World Hotel in Makati City on June…

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By Eileen G. Mangubat

LOCAL STRENGTH. The November 2012 national thanksgiving for the sainthood of the Visayan Pedro Calungsod was viewed online by Filipinos abroad. Live streaming of local events on news websites pulls in the viewers, but a good strategy for monetizing this patronage has yet to be found.

These remarks were first delivered during the 17th National Press Forum of the Philippine Press Institute at the New World Hotel in Makati City on June 14, 2013.

I was asked to introduce today’s topic, and I don’t intend to leave you feeling depressed. We had enough of that yesterday.

We are in a state of transition. I prefer to call it death-defying change.

We are told that the newspaper industry as we know it is a dinosaur heading for the museum.

Paper costs, electricity and other overhead expenses go up sharply each year but not advertising revenue and circulation.

The struggle is most keenly felt in the provinces where TV and radio reach more people, and thereby get the bigger share of advertising pesos. Continue Reading

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Is there no freedom of the press against media owners, managers?

In a local paper, a columnist was suspended for more than a month by its owners who, the columnist said, were requested by a politician-relative who was then caught in…

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In a local paper, a columnist was suspended for more than a month by its owners who, the columnist said, were requested by a politician-relative who was then caught in an election campaign turmoil.

In a local radio station, a commentator quit after he was ordered to “cease and desist” in his “one-sided attacks” against a public official.

In a Manila-based paper, the contract of a columnist was not renewed when her columns ran “on politically partisan grooves.”

In those cases, the inside story was not publicized and was only whispered about in coffee shops and bars. In all cases, the will of management prevailed. Continue Reading

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