Category: CJJ9

What do you know, Cebu Press Freedom Week started in 1984

By Erma M. Cuizon It was 30 years ago when Cebu media in 1984 came together as advocates of truth in community living and to declare the power of the…

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By Erma M. Cuizon

From left, Sun.Star Daily issues in September 1988, 1984 and 1994 announce the activities of the Cebu Press Freedom Week celebration.

It was 30 years ago when Cebu media in 1984 came together as advocates of truth in community living and to declare the power of the voice in the press. From then on, Cebu media tried its best to celebrate press freedom every year. This Sept. 20-27 is the 22nd celebration of the Cebu Press Freedom Week, continually empowering the efforts to unify and speak for the people.

Years before the Cebu press came together with one voice on its freedom, there were instances of persecutions from the 1970s up to the ‘80s during the Martial Law regime, especially in the ‘80s when there were cases of persecutions, killings and arrests of Cebu media personalities in a period in Philippine history when the voice of the people was stifled, not only in Cebu, but throughout the country.

But it was also in the ‘80s that Cebu media started to work in groups, to celebrate the freedom of the country after Martial Law was “lifted” and dictator Ferdinand Marcos fled the country while the Edsa Revolution would then show the world the Filipino spirit for freedom. Continue Reading

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Women lawyers as news anchors

These lawyers caught the eye of television networks seeking co-anchors for their male news program hosts. Not just eye candy, they pull their weight and meet the issues head-on. Atty….

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These lawyers caught the eye of television networks seeking co-anchors for their male news program hosts. Not just eye candy, they pull their weight and meet the issues head-on.

Atty. Rosemarie Olaño-Versoza

Atty. Rosemarie Olaño-Versoza

Her background in media and law gives Rose Versoza an advantage in her news anchor job in Balitang Bisdak because she has a deeper grasp of and wider perspective on how government operates and how people work around it.

Versoza says a news anchor whose background is purely in media work tends to ask questions based on what he thinks or feels the audience wants to know. But a lawyer like her would ask more probing questions, like the cause and effect, consequences, relevance and implications of an event.

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Cebu’s first woman editor: Fast and fearless

By Rebelander S. Basilan As editor of The Republic Daily (later renamed The Republic News), the late Judge Remedios Jayme Fernandez wrote three columns every day in 30 minutes. “She…

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Judge Remedios Jayme Fernandez (Contributed Photo)

By Rebelander S. Basilan

As editor of The Republic Daily (later renamed The Republic News), the late Judge Remedios Jayme Fernandez wrote three columns every day in 30 minutes.

“She wrote very fast, although she was using only a typewriter at that time,” recalled Manuel, 72, the oldest of Fernandez’s four children.

Fernandez, Cebu’s first woman editor, edited the newspaper published by Dioscoro B. Lazaro for 16 years (for the Cuenco family), Manuel said. Aside from editing stories, she wrote the paper’s editorial and two columns: “Launching Pad” and “Today.” Continue Reading

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Storm chasers

Honor for covering, surviving tempest GMA 7 Balitang Bisdak reporter Gregy Magdadaro and veteran video journalist Teodorico “Jun” Solon Jr. were stuck inside their vehicle. They were in the midst…

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FIGHTING FEAR. GMA 7 video journalist Teodorico “Jun” Solon Jr. (left) and Balitang Bisdak reporter Gregy Magdadaro fought fear, hunger and fatigue while covering super typhoon Yolanda’s wrath in northern Cebu.

Honor for covering, surviving tempest

GMA 7 Balitang Bisdak reporter Gregy Magdadaro and veteran video journalist Teodorico “Jun” Solon Jr. were stuck inside their vehicle.

They were in the midst of super typhoon Yolanda (international name: Haiyan), covering her wrath in the northern Cebu town of Daanbantayan last November.

And another storm was brewing, Magdadaro recalled.

But it came from a different place: inside him. At the most inconvenient time, he was suffering from an upset stomach. Continue Reading

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NEWSROOM TALES

Wrong ‘mayor’ The host of a radio station’s night talk show contacted by phone a reporter of its sister TV station. The reporter was then in Dumaguete City to pursue…

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Wrong ‘mayor’

The host of a radio station’s night talk show contacted by phone a reporter of its sister TV station. The reporter was then in Dumaguete City to pursue the story on the killing of lawyer Noel Archival. Archival was returning from a court hearing in Dumaguete when his vehicle was ambushed by armed men in Dalaguete, Cebu.

After getting an update from the reporter, who said “Mayor” was with him, the host asked that the mayor be put on the line.

For 30 minutes or so, the two talked about the incident, with the host believing it was the Dumaguete mayor he was interviewing. Continue Reading

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Women rule, Do they rock?

By: Rianne C. Tecson 6 women editors manage newsrooms of 5 Cebu dailies, a major news bureau and a nationwide news agency The media landscape of today is more challenging…

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By: Rianne C. Tecson

6 women editors manage newsrooms of 5 Cebu dailies, a major news bureau and a nationwide news agency

Nini Cabaero, editor-in-chief, Sun.Star Network Exchange

The media landscape of today is more challenging than ever. And the scenario is made more interesting by the fact that in Cebu newsrooms, women are at the helm of the efforts to deliver the news as it happens and across all platforms.

It isn’t a coincidence that all Cebu dailies—Cebu Daily News (CDN), Sun.Star Cebu, The Freeman (TF), and Cebuano language dailies Banat News and Sun.Star Superbalita [Cebu]—Sun.Star Network Exchange (Sunnex) and the Visayas bureau of the Philippine Daily Inquirer (PDI) are run by women. All six—CDN’s Eileen Mangubat, Sun.Star’s Isolde Amante, TF and Banat’s Quennie Bronce, Superbalita’s Michelle So, Sunnex’s Nini Cabaero and PDI’s Connie Fernandez—have been in the industry long enough to know the demands of the job and what it takes to stay on top of the game.
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The industry’s sports buffs

By Marian C. Baring Adrenaline outside the newsroom To journalists who’re sports buffs, adrenaline from chasing stories and meeting deadlines is not enough. As enthusiasts in their chosen sport, they…

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By Marian C. Baring

Adrenaline outside the newsroom

To journalists who’re sports buffs, adrenaline from chasing stories and meeting deadlines is not enough.

As enthusiasts in their chosen sport, they hone sense of discipline and virtue of persistence and they keep themselves physically and emotionally fit, which newspaper and broadcast work requires.

Pressure of reporting, writing or editing dissipates, substituted by the good kind of high that drives them in their calling, unaided by alcohol or substance abuse. PAS Continue Reading

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WHERE HAVE THEY GONE?

Newsroom jobs, practices phased out or changed with new technology and sharper management techniques Ask a “journ” or masscom graduate what job in a newspaper he can’t apply for. Aside…

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LINOTYPE. First introduced commercially in the USA in 1886, the linotype machine was used by newspapers and general printers to cast lines of type, rather than individual letters, hence its name, “line-o-type.” Sitting in front, the machine operator enters the text on a keyboard. The machine assembles letter molds to make a line. Heated metal is used to cast the assembled line as a single piece, called a “slug,” which awaits placing in a press for printing. After printing, the slugs can be melted again for use in other jobs. The machines and operators above are from Tri-bell Trading, Cebu City.

Newsroom jobs, practices phased out or changed with new technology and sharper management techniques

Ask a “journ” or masscom graduate what job in a newspaper he can’t apply for. Aside from editor-in-chief, a position rarely vacant, there’s no opening for proofreader. The job isn’t there anymore, hasn’t been there for some decades now.

A proofreader compares the text produced by the linotype and set up by the page composer (“cajista”) and reproduced on paper. He compares the proof with the text written by the reporter and edited by the editor and makes corrections on the proof, which then goes back to the linotypist to correct.

That job, time-consuming and messy (proofreader’s hands perpetually show ink smudges), is gone. Reason is plain: no more need to check production work with the editor’s original manuscript as writing, editing and “pagination” are done on computer. A case of technology changing work flow and procedure. Continue Reading

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Questions and Peary Aleonar

By Erma M. Cuizon COLUMN UNCOMMON Born in Carcar, a heritage city of Cebu province, the late Regional Trial Court Judge Peary G. Aleonar learned the musical arts of the…

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By Erma M. Cuizon

COLUMN UNCOMMON

Born in Carcar, a heritage city of Cebu province, the late Regional Trial Court Judge Peary G. Aleonar learned the musical arts of the piano, the violin, also of creative drawing in his early years as a 16-year-old Carcaranon in 1942. He then grew up to learn more of the other aspects of community living and became a concerned citizen who would speak for others through media. He finished a civil engineering course in 1949 and became an engineering college dean, then passed the bar in 1961 and became a practicing lawyer. A member of the Board of the Cebu City Integrated Bar of the Philippines, he was appointed RTC judge in 1983.

An artist, engineer, teacher, Aleonar was most of all a journalist who spoke for his community through publishing tasks and a regular writing of columns as guest writer, with the help of his publisher brother, Cesar Aleonar, who put up the Cebu Advocate which Peary edited. Having been one of the leading media workers in the region, the editor-columnist became president of the Association of Cebu Journalists. Continue Reading

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