Category: Journalism Tools and Trends

‘TRANS’ JOURNOS

Their work has shifted from newsroom to public information office;  from reporter to publicist;  from being watchdog of public officials to protector of the officials’ public image. They must spread…

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Their work has shifted from newsroom to public information office;  from reporter to publicist;  from being watchdog of public officials to protector of the officials’ public image. They must spread the ‘good news’ about their employer. Yet, they say, they ‘must still be truthful.’


THE Kingdom and the Power, Gay Talese’s 1969 book about the workings of The New York Times, opens with a pistol-shot of truth about journalists.

The most quoted part runs: “Most journalists are restless voyeurs who see the warts on the world, the imperfections of people and places… Gloom is their game, the spectacle their passion, normalcy their nemesis.”

But what happens when circumstances force a reversal of roles where they, who were once trained to spot official misconduct, become public information officers (government-speak for PR persons) paid to hide those “warts and  imperfections?” Continue Reading

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The hard-hitting radio commentators

Is bombast gone? And do they need to look good on screen too? Bombast and other techniques in the old days of broadcasting are undergoing changes. New technology allows the radio…

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Is bombast gone? And do they need to look good on screen too?

Bombast and other techniques in the old days of broadcasting are undergoing changes. New technology allows the radio talk show host not just to be heard but also seen. And engagement with the audience is speedier though there’s less voiced reaction from listeners.

The more telling change in the way radio commentaries are delivered these days is that talk show hosts are not just heard, they’re seen.

But then, in the late eighties going into the nineties, the requirement of voice quality was downgraded too. That was a big change in standards.

Voice timber and diction became less important than capacity to tackle public issues, along with the personality’s overall power to draw the audience.

Some of today’s top radio commentators benefited from devaluation of voice as factor for hiring. Many of them don’t have “the announcer’s voice” prized in the early days of radio. Continue Reading

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Cebu’s top talk show hosts on style, other changes

The raised voice, the fury: Nalzaro is still at it although, he says, his thrust is issue-based, not personality directed. Bañoc thinks the practice has long been abandoned, “if indeed…

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The raised voice, the fury: Nalzaro is still at it although, he says, his thrust is issue-based, not personality directed. Bañoc thinks the practice has long been abandoned, “if indeed it existed.”

Radio commentators are soldiers of the airwaves.

They come armed with opinions and ideas, and their mission is, with voices modulated or not, to infiltrate minds and hearts, and provoke thought on issues of the day.

When successful, their commentaries spark a revolution in the consciousness of listeners and foment in them ideas that depose the empire of apathy.  

To the actual subject of commentary — wayward public servants and others — a broadcaster’s words are bullets that wound the ego. “Toytoy,” “hanggaw,” “kuwanggol” and “amaw” are potent Cebuano adjectives, verbal bombs that form part of a wider arsenal of dark humor.  

But colonizers of the minds and emotions radio commentators are not. Their primary role is to present truths framed on their observation and insight of the current state of affairs.

The ultimate decision on whether to believe the commentator falls on the listener. Continue Reading

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Radio reaches 94% of Metro Cebu

The survey that reports to the Kapisanan ng mga Brodkaster ng Pilipinas claims a radio audience of 1.3 million Cebuanos. Stations dyHP and dySS for AM radio stations and dyWF…

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The survey that reports to the Kapisanan ng mga Brodkaster ng Pilipinas claims a radio audience of 1.3 million Cebuanos. Stations dyHP and dySS for AM radio stations and dyWF and dyRT on the FM band, Kantar Media says, top in audience share. Kantar Media figures give the image of a lopsided competition with one radio station leading the race by miles.

Radio still has a powerful hold on Metro Cebu listeners, a media survey covering the second quarter of 2018 shows.

Kantar Media, in a report to the Kapisanan ng mga Brodkaster ng Pilipinas (KBP), said radio programs in both AM and FM bands reach 94 percent of their sample population of 250 Metro Cebu households every week.

This, based on their computation, represents 1.3 million actual Cebuanos.

The study, commissioned by the Kapisanan ng mga Brodkaster ng Pilipinas (KBP) and carried out from June 21 to 27, 2018 also showed that individuals in Metro Cebu spend an average of three hours a day listening to their favorite programs.

While the version of the Kantar report given to the media does not establish what type of programming  is popular, it does indicate that radio is the foremost mode of information and entertainment for audiences classified as D and E. Continue Reading

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Better storytelling in the age of digital journalism

Journalism is a calling. If you’re in the industry to make money, journalism is not for you. That’s what Nancy Carvajal, an award-winning journalist who was once connected with the Philippine Daily Inquirer, told members of the media, information officers and bloggers who attended the digital journalism training organized by the Metrobank Foundation and Probe Media Foundation last July 8, 2016.

Many of those who joined the training nodded in agreement, not because they didn’t want to argue with the speaker, but because they themselves knew that it takes hard work and perseverance to become a top-notch journalist.

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2015 Journalists of the Year Howie Severino, Marites Vitug and Nancy Carvajal show how

Journalism is a calling. If you’re in the industry to make money, journalism is not for you. That’s what Nancy Carvajal, an award-winning journalist who was once connected with the Philippine Daily Inquirer, told members of the media, information officers and bloggers who attended the digital journalism training organized by the Metrobank Foundation and Probe Media Foundation last July 8, 2016.

Many of those who joined the training nodded in agreement, not because they didn’t want to argue with the speaker, but because they themselves knew that it takes hard work and perseverance to become a top-notch journalist. Continue Reading

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Live on Facebook Live

THERE is a new tool journalists are finding convenient to use: Facebook Live. It’s a streaming feature the social networking site Facebook made available starting January 2016. On Facebook Live,…

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THERE is a new tool journalists are finding convenient to use: Facebook Live.

It’s a streaming feature the social networking site Facebook made available starting January 2016.

On Facebook Live, a journalist can record events or interviews as they happen—unedited, raw, and direct to his audience on Facebook. Continue Reading

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Newsroom disintegration and more

The mantra for many newsrooms in the past five or more years was convergence. Join forces and platforms to remain relevant to our increasingly tech-savvy and gadget-wielding audience. Before these…

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The mantra for many newsrooms in the past five or more years was convergence. Join forces and platforms to remain relevant to our increasingly tech-savvy and gadget-wielding audience.

Before these integration attempts could even gain traction, the battle cry appears to be changing from convergence to disintegration.

Not to mean the scattering of forces into small parts, but the rise in the demand for specialization. It is not a reversal of what was started years ago. Disintegration means trying a new approach when attempts at integration hit a wall because of resistance by journalists or the impracticability of it. If it is no longer feasible to push convergence, why not try a different approach?

Disintegration and the call for a deeper knowledge of the audience are among the challenges that face newsrooms nowadays in the midst of calls to adapt to technology developments and media landscape changes.

Experts have said the future of journalism is not about journalists. It is about the audience. There are online tools available to track audiences and their profiles, but it is up to the organizations to analyze their data and use them.

Ethan Zuckerman, in his “Future of news and participatory media” class at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), said journalism is at a crossroads. The audience has the same publishing and editing tools as journalists; business models are failing; mobile is becoming more disruptive than the Internet some 15 years ago.

And yet, the public’s need for high-quality information about current events remains unchanged.

Stagnant

In the Philippines, newspaper readership may be stagnant or declining, but it doesn’t mean people are not getting the news.

Internet penetration in the Philippines is at 30 percent of the 100 million population. Mobile phone ownership was at 86 million as of 2012. It was projected last year that half of phone owners, or 43 million, would own smartphones or devices that connect to the Internet.

There are 25 million Filipinos on Facebook, making us the eighth in the list of countries on Facebook.

Those statistics show the slice of the audience that gets its news not from newspapers or television, but from social media, news websites and mobile sites.

The principle of disintegration is based on the need for specialization in the writing and dissemination of news per audience, per platform. A younger and more interactive audience set may be targeted on Twitter, while a critical and highly opinionated one may be comfortable on Facebook. An older audience may prefer reading newspapers and news websites.

Familiarity with readers and knowing how they get their news makes newsroom disintegration a practical approach to serving different audience sets and platforms.

Disintegration is not doing away with whatever gains were achieved with the converging of forces and resources towards a multi-platform, multi-screen publication of information. It simply is a strategy to step back, assess the situation, accept limitations and ask why this or that didn’t turn out the way we expected.

Bertrand Pecquerie, head of the Global Editors Network, reported after a summit attended by over 600 editors and media innovators on June 11 to 13, 2014, “Today the trend has reversed towards newsroom disintegration: specific teams for specific platforms.” (http://www.globaleditorsnetwork.org/)

Mobile, as a news platform, is becoming more disruptive than the Internet because news reporting and presentation are different for the newspaper, on the website and on mobile. Online changed the market and workflow for the newspaper. The characteristics of mobile—portability, access anywhere and anytime, and affordability of gadgets—make it disruptive to both online and newspapers.

Pecquerie said the newsroom would become a “mission control” room with fewer people at desks and more journalists on the field.

At this control room, editors also look at the tools available to help the audience make sense of the news. Data visualization and annotation are some of the ways to make the news easy to understand.

Resources

Here are resources that might help.

For data visualization – making news reports easy to understand:

  • Meograph: Web-based multimedia presentation tool with audio clips and maps.
  • Zeega: A multimedia storytelling platform for integrating web-based sound, video, and GIFs in a slideshow format.
  • Storify: An easy way to quote social media and embed it in other stories.

For data journalism – making sense of big amounts of data:

  • “Data Journalism: Making it Real,” Andy Dickinson
  • “How to analyze unfamiliar data,” Ted Cuzzillo
  • “4 examples of innovative online newsgathering,” Sarah Marshall

For research and data collection:

  • Facebook Graph Search: Facebook’s social search service.
  • Simply Measured: Collects analytics about people’s Twitter accounts.
  • Storyful: A service to verify social media.
  • IFTTT: A tool to capture data feeds from the Internet and make them for you.
  • Google Fusion Tables: A tool to combine multiple data sets and publish them in various ways.

For annotation:

  • Bounce: An online annotation platform where you can annotate web pages.
  • Annotation Studio: Modern and usable annotation system, developed at MIT.
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News on social media: Who gets the scoop?

By Maria Armie Sheila Garde Social media continues to change the way newsrooms gather, process and publish information. News organizations and journalists themselves are seeing the opportunities in boosting their…

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Marian Codilla, multimedia editor, Cebu Daily News

By Maria Armie Sheila Garde

Social media continues to change the way newsrooms gather, process and publish information. News organizations and journalists themselves are seeing the opportunities in boosting their online presence through social media sites like Twitter, Facebook and Instagram, among others.

Media practitioners are also well aware of the challenges in the way news is gathered, read and shared through these online tools. Now that information is blown out first on social media, how does news become exclusive and who gets the scoop?

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Authors (not) Anonymous

Technology helps unmask Web miscreants How are people held accountable for what they say in digital media? Traditional journalists working for newspapers, radio or TV can be sued for libel…

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Technology helps unmask Web miscreants

How are people held accountable for what they say in digital media?

Traditional journalists working for newspapers, radio or TV can be sued for libel and are easily identifiable. They are also employed by registered organizations that you can complain to when you have issues with their work.

In digital media, however, it is harder. The decentralized design of the Internet enables anonymity and false identities, which can make it difficult to go after people.

But while it is easy to think you are anonymous online, you’re actually not. Your Internet-connected devices—laptops, phones and tablets—are snitches that leave a digital trail that can be followed. You can be traced via your device’s Internet Protocol (IP) address, a series of numbers that uniquely identifies your gadget in the network, with the help of service providers and tech experts. Victims of online abuse can file complaints with the website and work with authorities to unmask these people. Continue Reading

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How are newspapers surviving in the digital age?

By Eileen G. Mangubat These remarks were first delivered during the 17th National Press Forum of the Philippine Press Institute at the New World Hotel in Makati City on June…

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By Eileen G. Mangubat

LOCAL STRENGTH. The November 2012 national thanksgiving for the sainthood of the Visayan Pedro Calungsod was viewed online by Filipinos abroad. Live streaming of local events on news websites pulls in the viewers, but a good strategy for monetizing this patronage has yet to be found.

These remarks were first delivered during the 17th National Press Forum of the Philippine Press Institute at the New World Hotel in Makati City on June 14, 2013.

I was asked to introduce today’s topic, and I don’t intend to leave you feeling depressed. We had enough of that yesterday.

We are in a state of transition. I prefer to call it death-defying change.

We are told that the newspaper industry as we know it is a dinosaur heading for the museum.

Paper costs, electricity and other overhead expenses go up sharply each year but not advertising revenue and circulation.

The struggle is most keenly felt in the provinces where TV and radio reach more people, and thereby get the bigger share of advertising pesos. Continue Reading

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