Category: Media Issues

Politics and Cebu media

Politicians use media for their messages to the public: information needed for them to push their program of governance and propaganda to defend themselves against criticism and win their election…

Continue Reading

Politicians use media for their messages to the public: information needed for them to push their program of governance and propaganda to defend themselves against criticism and win their election fights.

Through the years, media has improved technology, branched out on multi-platforms, honed skills of craft and upgraded standards and values.

That hasn’t curbed zeal and enthusiasm to exploit media as a major instrument for securing and keeping political power.

Instead, with media’s better practices, spurred by technology and competition, it has also led to more sophisticated methods of politicians in exploiting media. Continue Reading

No Comments on Politics and Cebu media

Why I see a longer lease on print life

We’ve heard and read about it during the past few years: Newspapers, along with magazines and books, have been sideswiped by high-tech gadgets such as smartphones, smart TVs, tablets and…

Continue Reading

We’ve heard and read about it during the past few years: Newspapers, along with magazines and books, have been sideswiped by high-tech gadgets such as smartphones, smart TVs, tablets and e-books.

And a continuing decline in circulation and advertising revenues tends to confirm the handwriting we have all seen on the industry’s wall: how much future is left for print media?

Continue Reading

No Comments on Why I see a longer lease on print life

Cebu media 10 years from now

Ten years ago, going to one’s beat assignment every day to gather news stories and submitting them to the editors before the 8 p.m. deadline was the norm. It was…

Continue Reading

Ten years ago, going to one’s beat assignment every day to gather news stories and submitting them to the editors before the 8 p.m. deadline was the norm. It was the only way to get published if you worked in a newspaper.

But that was before mobile devices, Internet access and social media platforms all became available and affordable to Cebu’s journalists.

Continue Reading

No Comments on Cebu media 10 years from now

Press behind bars: Journalists remember martial law

To generations used to the marketplace exchange of information in this digital age, martial law represents the country’s excursion into the alien and bizarre. Information was not for everyone. Truth…

Continue Reading

Juan L. Mercado

To generations used to the marketplace exchange of information in this digital age, martial law represents the country’s excursion into the alien and bizarre.

Information was not for everyone. Truth could be subverted for a higher good, like security or survival. Journalists, who did not sieve information with the sensitivity of the state, had to be muzzled before they could do more harm.
Information, lives—like scraps of paper, these were lost in the bureaucracy created to hold up one man’s rule.

Juan L. Mercado and Dr. Resil B. Mojares were among those who were “neutralized” or “invited”—euphemisms for the directive to military intelligence agents to take into custody political and non-political leaders after President Ferdinand E. Marcos signed Proclamation 1081 on Sept. 21, 1972, which placed the country under martial law (ML). Continue Reading

No Comments on Press behind bars: Journalists remember martial law

Is there no freedom of the press against media owners, managers?

In a local paper, a columnist was suspended for more than a month by its owners who, the columnist said, were requested by a politician-relative who was then caught in…

Continue Reading

In a local paper, a columnist was suspended for more than a month by its owners who, the columnist said, were requested by a politician-relative who was then caught in an election campaign turmoil.

In a local radio station, a commentator quit after he was ordered to “cease and desist” in his “one-sided attacks” against a public official.

In a Manila-based paper, the contract of a columnist was not renewed when her columns ran “on politically partisan grooves.”

In those cases, the inside story was not publicized and was only whispered about in coffee shops and bars. In all cases, the will of management prevailed. Continue Reading

No Comments on Is there no freedom of the press against media owners, managers?

Type on the field below and hit Enter/Return to search