Fake News: View of a non-journalist

  By Rev. Fr. Ramon D. Echica [Based on his talk at the Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC) media forum during Cebu Press Freedom Week 2019, held at MBF Cebu Press…

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Cebu journalists exposed to China media, culture in group visits

It is  new only because the invitation comes from China through “private organizations.” For decades a similar grant, but for trips to the United States, was offered by the American…

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Expanded Sotto Law to benefit more media practitioners

The amendment to the Sotto Law, also known as Press Freedom Law, expanding the protection to journalists, has finally been approved. The law now covers not just print journalists but …

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‘TRANS’ JOURNOS

Their work has shifted from newsroom to public information office;  from reporter to publicist;  from being watchdog of public officials to protector of the officials’ public image. They must spread…

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Ernesto ​D. Lariosa ​​(1944-2019)

The multi-awarded fiction writer played key role in using Cebuano-Bisaya to produce Cebu’s first native-language daily. He went into journalism but never left his first passion, literary writing. INFLUENTIAL literary…

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STATEMENT

Cebu Citizens-Press Council Saturday, July 27, 2019 Senator Sotto’s bill doesn’t define ‘false content’ and grants arbitrary power of virtual censorship to government bureaucrats. ​​The Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC) earnestly…

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How metro mayors and the governor deal with media

Most elected public officials affirm the often-avowed policy of staying “open and transparent” to the public through media. But, as new leaders in their respective local governments, they may modify p.r….

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Media Self-regulation through Media Literacy: Insights from the Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC)

Abstract How does the press regulate itself? Through document research, key informant interviews, and participant observation, the researcher studied how the Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC) promotes media self-regulation (MSR) among…

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THE 2019 DILI DIALOGUE FORUM

CCPC attendance at Timor Leste meeting enables it to share, and compare, its experience on press councils with other media groups in the region By Karlon N. Rama AN INTERNATIONAL…

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In his 50s, FCE (1927-2019) showed peers what grit looked like

For many years, alone with his editor while already in his 50s, and with one junior reporter when he was pushing 70, Fred C. Espinoza filled the pages of the…

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How newsrooms cope with the new media

Two decades ago, Mark Zuckerberg was just eight years old. Journalism as we knew it meant news delivered through milled paper, a crackling radio or a trusty TV set. Today,…

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Two decades ago, Mark Zuckerberg was just eight years old. Journalism as we knew it meant news delivered through milled paper, a crackling radio or a trusty TV set.

Today, Zuckerberg, 28, is a billionaire, and Facebook, the social network he created just eight years ago, has 900 million users. An audience this size, most media outlets only dream about.

But Facebook didn’t do it all on its own. It had an enabler: the Internet. Continue Reading

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Why newspapers survive

Newsprint is just the body; content, the soul, endures “We will stop printing the New York Times in the future, the date TBD (to be determined).” —Arthur Sulzberger Jr. in…

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Newsprint is just the body; content, the soul, endures

“We will stop printing the New York Times in the future, the date TBD (to be determined).”
—Arthur Sulzberger Jr. in 2010 London International Newsroom Summit

Despite dark predictions about the future of print media, must response be to kill the newspaper and go online or, worse, just disappear? Continue Reading

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From dream to stream

Live streaming brings drama to audiences in real time Cebuanos in and outside the Philippines erupted in cheers when they first saw the Sinulog, Cebu’s grandest festival, being aired live…

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Live streaming brings drama to audiences in real time

Cebuanos in and outside the Philippines erupted in cheers when they first saw the Sinulog, Cebu’s grandest festival, being aired live over the Internet in 2008.

Sun.Star, the media company to pioneer live streaming among community newspapers nationwide, has received overwhelming support and requests for more real-time coverage since. And this experience highlighted how effective and important live reporting is in getting the message across borders.

The Sun.Star live streaming is aired over its website at www.sunstar.com.ph. Each streaming, or reporting live over the Internet, is accompanied by live blogging that allows viewers to interact with reporters and fellow viewers in real time by typing their comments on a blog or message board. Continue Reading

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NEWSROOM TALES

Beauty under fire Years before Ryan Borinaga became entertainment editor of Banat News, he was a hard-news reporter covering police and military. Gay and proud, Ryan wants to look his…

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Beauty under fire

Years before Ryan Borinaga became entertainment editor of Banat News, he was a hard-news reporter covering police and military.

Gay and proud, Ryan wants to look his loveliest when he steps out. Before going to bed, he is fastidious in his beauty routine.

One night, he was about to doze off when his newsroom alerted him about a fire that struck the old high school building of University of Cebu along Sanciangko St., Cebu City.

He jumped out of bed and, with a bag that contained notebook, pen and recorder, he rushed to join other reporters at the fire scene.

And they stared and stared at him as he went about his work.

Back in the boarding house, he knew why he grabbed their attention: his face was still covered with the white bleaching cream he had put on before going to bed. Continue Reading

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Cebu Daily News—Siloy goes beyond gray print columns

By Marian Z. Codilla and Eileen G. Mangubat One of Cebu Daily News’ most compelling stories was triggered by a Facebook photo of an unnamed teenage girl trying to stand…

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By Marian Z. Codilla and Eileen G. Mangubat

One of Cebu Daily News’ most compelling stories was triggered by a Facebook photo of an unnamed teenage girl trying to stand on the back of a whale shark in the shallows of a coastal town.

The image sparked online outrage, but it took a CDN reporter to track down the joyrider to Boljoon town, south Cebu, where she tearfully apologized for what she thought was a fun, harmless antic.

It was “NO FUN FOR TUKI,” said the CDN headline.

Town officials were prompted to take more vigilant action to protect the gentle whale sharks who swim close to the shore in south Cebu’s newest tourist attraction. Continue Reading

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Blog Almighty

There has never been a better time to be a journalist than today, when tools, most of them free, allow anyone to be a publisher and make money from content….

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There has never been a better time to be a journalist than today, when tools, most of them free, allow anyone to be a publisher and make money from content. Today, anyone can put up a news website using the very same tools running the websites of top publications like the Philippine Daily Inquirer and ABS-CBN News.

To be an effective journalist today, however, one needs to know more than just writing and reporting; one needs to have technical skills.

Journalists today have, at the minimum, to know how to blog. The tools used to run blogs, called content management systems, have become so powerful they are now used to run news websites. They have to be able to work with web services and social networks to enhance their reporting. Continue Reading

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Advance of digital media

It’s hard to place a number on the digital media consumption in Cebu or even in the Philippines. There is scant publicly available data on how people consume the news…

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It’s hard to place a number on the digital media consumption in Cebu or even in the Philippines. There is scant publicly available data on how people consume the news on digital platforms. Various organizations based in the United States, however, have done extensive studies on the topic. These studies may provide a peek into future trends in the Philippines although in several areas like those in mobile, the country is at times ahead.

One such organization is the Pew Research Center for its Project for Excellence in Journalism (PEJ). PEJ releases a yearly The State of the News Media report that serves as zeitgeist for the news industry. Here are statistics gleaned from various reports: Continue Reading

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Shaping the voice

It’s one voice from the press and the citizens although as to the non-media component, members don’t represent the total community. When an issue is raised before the Cebu Citizens-Press…

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It’s one voice from the press and the citizens although as to the non-media component, members don’t represent the total community.

When an issue is raised before the Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC), it is first studied by a small panel (usually with Cebu Media Legal Aid lawyers when a legal question is involved) before a draft is written and circulated among members and advisers.

Feedback is considered in the rewriting of the draft or drafts to come up with a version that reflects a consensus.

Then, CCPC takes it up at an en banc session where resource persons are heard before further changes are made and the vote is taken.

News stories report the gist of the resolution while the full text is published in newspapers and posted on the CCPC website (www.cebucitizenspresscouncil.org). Copies are mailed to national media organizations and government or private offices affected by the CCPC action.

Do they listen to CCPC? Sometimes they do, with results shown on changes of law or policy. More important is that media and citizenry speak out as one and can’t be deemed in default on vital issues that concern the press and its public. Pachico A. Seares Continue Reading

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Women in the newsroom: From ‘news hen’ to boss

In the 1980s, first year Mass Communication students at the University of the Philippines (UP) Cebu had the impression that being a woman and a journalist at the same time…

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The Freeman newsroom

In the 1980s, first year Mass Communication students at the University of the Philippines (UP) Cebu had the impression that being a woman and a journalist at the same time meant covering the “soft” beats of lifestyle and society.

This perception stemmed mainly from being taught print journalism and broadcasting basics by “news hens,” a term denoting veteran female writers and reporters that was still widely used in newspaper articles and class readings.

However, for the students, the tag was a pejorative. It underlined the contrast between the journalistic equivalent of scratching the surface of social realities and the “real” challenge of journalism that the “news hounds,” with their “nose for news,” carried out: cover government and expose wrongdoing. The term “news hound” was exclusively used for male journalists.

Careers would have been misaligned if the students were not assigned to research on “women trailblazers” in pre- and post-war journalism in Cebu. There were only a few women with “a nose for news” then, and all of them had to blaze a trail of their own in the absence of any formal education (also true for the males) and predecessors. Continue Reading

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A walk to remember: 17 years of Cebu Press Freedom Week

By Rebelander S. Basilan It started as a simple activity in 1994. Looking back, journalist-lawyer Pachico Seares said the first Cebu Press Freedom Week (CPFW) featured a fun walk, an…

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By Rebelander S. Basilan

THE EARLY YEARS. From left, Mildred Galarpe, then from The Freeman; Jack Biantan (holding megaphone) and Thea Riñen (holding fan), both then from Sun.Star Daily (since renamed Sun.Star Cebu); and Jane Paredes (holding two children), then from dyRC, join the opening parade during an early celebration of Cebu Press Freedom Week.

It started as a simple activity in 1994. Looking back, journalist-lawyer Pachico Seares said the first Cebu Press Freedom Week (CPFW) featured a fun walk, an opening night and a closing night, with one or two forums in between.

The first CPFW, in which less than 50 people participated, was meant to show a unified media that responds to any attempt to suppress its rights.

“It has turned out to be more than that,” Seares said. “It’s a showcase of media unity but it’s also a reservoir of goodwill and fellowship, a place for colleagues and competitors to gather, talk, chill out.”

The beginning of CPFW can be traced back to as early as Sept. 10, 1988, when leaders of media organizations in Cebu formed the Council of Cebu Media Leaders (CCML). Continue Reading

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Cyber libel as 'continuing crime'

Libel, ‘false’ news now carry stiffer fines

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