Cebu journalists exposed to China media, culture in group visits

It is  new only because the invitation comes from China through “private organizations.” For decades a similar grant, but for trips to the United States, was offered by the American…

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Expanded Sotto Law to benefit more media practitioners

The amendment to the Sotto Law, also known as Press Freedom Law, expanding the protection to journalists, has finally been approved. The law now covers not just print journalists but …

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‘TRANS’ JOURNOS

Their work has shifted from newsroom to public information office;  from reporter to publicist;  from being watchdog of public officials to protector of the officials’ public image. They must spread…

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Ernesto ​D. Lariosa ​​(1944-2019)

The multi-awarded fiction writer played key role in using Cebuano-Bisaya to produce Cebu’s first native-language daily. He went into journalism but never left his first passion, literary writing. INFLUENTIAL literary…

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STATEMENT

Cebu Citizens-Press Council Saturday, July 27, 2019 Senator Sotto’s bill doesn’t define ‘false content’ and grants arbitrary power of virtual censorship to government bureaucrats. ​​The Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC) earnestly…

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How metro mayors and the governor deal with media

Most elected public officials affirm the often-avowed policy of staying “open and transparent” to the public through media. But, as new leaders in their respective local governments, they may modify p.r….

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Media Self-regulation through Media Literacy: Insights from the Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC)

Abstract How does the press regulate itself? Through document research, key informant interviews, and participant observation, the researcher studied how the Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC) promotes media self-regulation (MSR) among…

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THE 2019 DILI DIALOGUE FORUM

CCPC attendance at Timor Leste meeting enables it to share, and compare, its experience on press councils with other media groups in the region By Karlon N. Rama AN INTERNATIONAL…

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In his 50s, FCE (1927-2019) showed peers what grit looked like

For many years, alone with his editor while already in his 50s, and with one junior reporter when he was pushing 70, Fred C. Espinoza filled the pages of the…

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CCPC cautions public in assessing “media plot”

“A matrix presented by public officials could lead to something more than a verbal attack from those criticized. In the campaign on illegal drugs, many of those in the matrix…

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Who pays for the microphone?

Five radio commentators (picked by CJJ for their broadcast experience, audience reach, and popularity) know who pays for the microphone. When a radio opinion maker takes a stand on an…

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Five radio commentators (picked by CJJ for their broadcast experience, audience reach, and popularity) know who pays for the microphone.

When a radio opinion maker takes a stand on an issue, castigates an erring public official, or praises him to the heavens, he considers the payor, his “boss.”

Not the station manager or owner, although the radio commentator needs to obey station and broadcast rules, but the public.

Remember what Ronald Reagan, in a debate during the 1980 New Hampshire primary, said when the host ordered the soundman to cut off Reagan’s microphone? He shouted, “I am paying for this microphone, Mr. (Breen)!”

It turned out that Reagan’s campaign did pick up the tab for the debate. And he claimed his right with honest vigor, which virtually won him the presidency. Continue Reading

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On the trail of a missing marker

To remember the sacrifice of Antonio Abad Tormis in the name of press freedom, a marker was installed at the site of his 1961 murder. But in July 2010, his…

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To remember the sacrifice of Antonio Abad Tormis in the name of press freedom, a marker was installed at the site of his 1961 murder.

But in July 2010, his son Antonio Jr. told Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC) assistant executive director Cherry Ann Lim that the marker had disappeared.

CCPC executive director Pachico Seares thereafter sent Lim and Sun.Star Cebu assistant news editor Gingging Campaña on a mission to gather information on the marker.

Campaña called the Cultural and Historical Commission of Cebu City Hall, but it had no record of a marker built for Tormis. Neither did the Zoning Division, which keeps all records pertaining to markers, nor the City Council secretariat records section.

What the City Council secretariat had was an ordinance and resolution, passed on July 13, 1966, naming the road from P. Del Rosario Ext. passing Aznar Coliseum to the TB Pavilion after Tormis. Continue Reading

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Watching media cover the elections

A year-long effort to enrich election coverage In the highly politicized Philippines, elections are major events. In the May 2010 elections, candidates, promises, foibles and scandals fell under media scrutiny….

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A year-long effort to enrich election coverage

In the highly politicized Philippines, elections are major events.

In the May 2010 elections, candidates, promises, foibles and scandals fell under media scrutiny. But the media were themselves subject to examination.

As part of its mandate to improve the journalism craft, the Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC) held a series of consultations from June 2009 to March 2010 to improve local media’s coverage of the 2010 elections. Continue Reading

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The Elliptical man

This article originally appeared in a UP College of Communication magazine devoted to the awardee and circulated during the awards ceremony. In the beginning was the printed word. Growing up…

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This article originally appeared in a UP College of Communication magazine devoted to the awardee and circulated during the awards ceremony.

In the beginning was the printed word.

Growing up in Sibonga, some 50 kilometers south of Cebu City, Pachico A. Seares recalls being a wide reader. This preoccupation was not unusual in itself as the town was as sleepy as any in the 1950s, and the young man nicknamed Cheking was not only the son of Ramon Seares Sr. and Purificacion Alicaya, public school teachers, but also distinguished by a total lack of athletic prowess.

But as with all first loves, the passion for reading, which was to spawn Cheking’s enduring affair with writing, flourished at great cost. To reach the town’s two bookshelves, the diffident, gangly teenager had to enter the town hall, walk up flights of stairs and go down corridors, and run the gauntlet of officials and petitioners hanging around public offices. Continue Reading

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NEWSROOM TALES: Veteran broadcaster

Those were the days when broadcast stations had no reporters and relied on the newspapers for their local news. One morning, S.D. Tecson, handling the morning prime news slot of…

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Those were the days when broadcast stations had no reporters and relied on the newspapers for their local news.

One morning, S.D. Tecson, handling the morning prime news slot of dyRC, marked stories on a copy of “Republic Daily” (fetched by a messenger from the paper’s office and printing plant along Colon, near D. Jakosalem St.). He numbered the stories in the order in which he would read them. Continue Reading

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Beginnings of Cebu media professionalism

By Godofredo M. Roperos IN AUGUST 1947, kzRC was revived under the management of the Cebu Broadcasting Company, becoming the first postwar commercial station outside of the national capital. When…

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By Godofredo M. Roperos

IN AUGUST 1947, kzRC was revived under the management of the Cebu Broadcasting Company, becoming the first postwar commercial station outside of the national capital. When the government required in 1949 that the radio stations in the country should carry henceforth the “dy” in its name, it became dyRC. The following year, in 1950, the Philippine Broadcasting Corporation opened dyBU as a competitor of dyRC.

The friendly competition went on until September 1972 when dyRC came to an abrupt end. It was ordered to cease operation at the onset of Martial Law. When it reopened in January 1975, the two pioneering Cebu radio stations had fallen under one ownership: the Elizaldes. And it remained so until August 1999 when dyRC permanently stopped operation after 60 years of being on-air, reportedly due to heavy losses.

On the other hand, the Cebu dailies fought their way to survival through sheer courage and determination. And because the staff members in the meantime agreed to work with only the assurance that they could get cash advances when ad payments could be collected.

Professionalism in the print media did not begin until the decade of the 1980s. In a sense, until Sun.Star Daily’s entry in the print media industry, it was largely a touch-and-go affair where the paper’s next issue would depend on the good will of the printer. Continue Reading

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The Early Cebu Press

By Resil B. Mojares Excerpted from “Cebuano Literature,” San Carlos Publications, 1975 It is in the pages of local tabloids and magazines that the great bulk of Cebuano printed literature…

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By Resil B. Mojares

Excerpted from “Cebuano Literature,” San Carlos Publications, 1975

OLD CEBU NEWSPAPERS. They started local journalism. Not one paper, however survived.

It is in the pages of local tabloids and magazines that the great bulk of Cebuano printed literature is to be found. For this reason, Cebuano literary history is intimately connected with the rise of local journalism.

Cebuano journalism began towards the close of the 19th century. Though Cebu is the oldest Spanish settlement in the country, it was not until 1886—seventy-five years after Del Superior Govierno came out in Manila—that the first Cebu newspaper was established. The early transfer of the seat of government to Manila relegated Cebu to the realm of the provincial. Since then Manila has been the center in the centrifugal dissemination of, among others, western technology in communications. Continue Reading

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Antonio Abad Tormis

(1916-1961) A frame that hangs in the Tormis house in Cebu City summarizes Antonio Abad Tormis’ life as a journalist who died for his cause: “To remind a free people…

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(1916-1961)

A frame that hangs in the Tormis house in Cebu City summarizes Antonio Abad Tormis’ life as a journalist who died for his cause: “To remind a free people that the price of their freedom is the blood of martyrs.”

It is the Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award, given by the Department of Journalism of the Southern Illinois University after Antonio died from an assassin’s bullet on July 3, 1961.

His wife, Lux, 89, had constantly pleaded with her husband to take it easy on his campaign against corrupt government officials. She told him his exposés could cost him his life.   Continue Reading

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Cyber libel as 'continuing crime'

Libel, ‘false’ news now carry stiffer fines

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