STATEMENT

Cebu Citizens-Press Council Saturday, July 27, 2019 Senator Sotto’s bill doesn’t define ‘false content’ and grants arbitrary power of virtual censorship to government bureaucrats. ​​The Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC) earnestly…

Continue Reading

How metro mayors and the governor deal with media

Most elected public officials affirm the often-avowed policy of staying “open and transparent” to the public through media. But, as new leaders in their respective local governments, they may modify p.r….

Continue Reading

Media Self-regulation through Media Literacy: Insights from the Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC)

Abstract How does the press regulate itself? Through document research, key informant interviews, and participant observation, the researcher studied how the Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC) promotes media self-regulation (MSR) among…

Continue Reading

THE 2019 DILI DIALOGUE FORUM

CCPC attendance at Timor Leste meeting enables it to share, and compare, its experience on press councils with other media groups in the region By Karlon N. Rama AN INTERNATIONAL…

Continue Reading

In his 50s, FCE (1927-2019) showed peers what grit looked like

For many years, alone with his editor while already in his 50s, and with one junior reporter when he was pushing 70, Fred C. Espinoza filled the pages of the…

Continue Reading

CCPC cautions public in assessing “media plot”

“A matrix presented by public officials could lead to something more than a verbal attack from those criticized. In the campaign on illegal drugs, many of those in the matrix…

Continue Reading

Under-coverage of local governments: public officials’ gripes, media’s explanation

  Mayors, mostly of LGUs outside Metro Cebu, complain that their projects and programs have not been publicized by mainstream media. “They send out reporters and news crew to us…

Continue Reading

Godofredo Roperos: A long love affair with writing

In Manila, the almost-four-decade career of Godofredo M. Roperos, 88, covered assignments in reporting, magazine editing, and literary writing. It was interrupted by his work with the government as assistant…

Continue Reading

Cerge Remonde: the ‘probinsyano’ beat reporter who became Press Secretary

He spoke truth to power as a newspaper columnist and radio commentator. But in a reversal of roles, Remonde defended power as press secretary to then president Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo who,…

Continue Reading

Reinventing the newspaper

A series of articles that CJJ hopes will set off a conversation among practitioners and students of journalism as well as media consumers on the crisis that afflicts print media,…

Continue Reading

NEWSROOM TALES: Veteran broadcaster

Those were the days when broadcast stations had no reporters and relied on the newspapers for their local news. One morning, S.D. Tecson, handling the morning prime news slot of…

Continue Reading

Those were the days when broadcast stations had no reporters and relied on the newspapers for their local news.

One morning, S.D. Tecson, handling the morning prime news slot of dyRC, marked stories on a copy of “Republic Daily” (fetched by a messenger from the paper’s office and printing plant along Colon, near D. Jakosalem St.). He numbered the stories in the order in which he would read them. Continue Reading

No Comments on NEWSROOM TALES: Veteran broadcaster

Beginnings of Cebu media professionalism

By Godofredo M. Roperos IN AUGUST 1947, kzRC was revived under the management of the Cebu Broadcasting Company, becoming the first postwar commercial station outside of the national capital. When…

Continue Reading

By Godofredo M. Roperos

IN AUGUST 1947, kzRC was revived under the management of the Cebu Broadcasting Company, becoming the first postwar commercial station outside of the national capital. When the government required in 1949 that the radio stations in the country should carry henceforth the “dy” in its name, it became dyRC. The following year, in 1950, the Philippine Broadcasting Corporation opened dyBU as a competitor of dyRC.

The friendly competition went on until September 1972 when dyRC came to an abrupt end. It was ordered to cease operation at the onset of Martial Law. When it reopened in January 1975, the two pioneering Cebu radio stations had fallen under one ownership: the Elizaldes. And it remained so until August 1999 when dyRC permanently stopped operation after 60 years of being on-air, reportedly due to heavy losses.

On the other hand, the Cebu dailies fought their way to survival through sheer courage and determination. And because the staff members in the meantime agreed to work with only the assurance that they could get cash advances when ad payments could be collected.

Professionalism in the print media did not begin until the decade of the 1980s. In a sense, until Sun.Star Daily’s entry in the print media industry, it was largely a touch-and-go affair where the paper’s next issue would depend on the good will of the printer. Continue Reading

No Comments on Beginnings of Cebu media professionalism

The Early Cebu Press

By Resil B. Mojares Excerpted from “Cebuano Literature,” San Carlos Publications, 1975 It is in the pages of local tabloids and magazines that the great bulk of Cebuano printed literature…

Continue Reading

By Resil B. Mojares

Excerpted from “Cebuano Literature,” San Carlos Publications, 1975

OLD CEBU NEWSPAPERS. They started local journalism. Not one paper, however survived.

It is in the pages of local tabloids and magazines that the great bulk of Cebuano printed literature is to be found. For this reason, Cebuano literary history is intimately connected with the rise of local journalism.

Cebuano journalism began towards the close of the 19th century. Though Cebu is the oldest Spanish settlement in the country, it was not until 1886—seventy-five years after Del Superior Govierno came out in Manila—that the first Cebu newspaper was established. The early transfer of the seat of government to Manila relegated Cebu to the realm of the provincial. Since then Manila has been the center in the centrifugal dissemination of, among others, western technology in communications. Continue Reading

No Comments on The Early Cebu Press

Antonio Abad Tormis

(1916-1961) A frame that hangs in the Tormis house in Cebu City summarizes Antonio Abad Tormis’ life as a journalist who died for his cause: “To remind a free people…

Continue Reading

(1916-1961)

A frame that hangs in the Tormis house in Cebu City summarizes Antonio Abad Tormis’ life as a journalist who died for his cause: “To remind a free people that the price of their freedom is the blood of martyrs.”

It is the Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award, given by the Department of Journalism of the Southern Illinois University after Antonio died from an assassin’s bullet on July 3, 1961.

His wife, Lux, 89, had constantly pleaded with her husband to take it easy on his campaign against corrupt government officials. She told him his exposés could cost him his life.   Continue Reading

No Comments on Antonio Abad Tormis

Cyber libel as 'continuing crime'

Libel, ‘false’ news now carry stiffer fines

Download CJJ digital editions

Type on the field below and hit Enter/Return to search