THE 2019 DILI DIALOGUE FORUM

CCPC attendance at Timor Leste meeting enables it to share, and compare, its experience on press councils with other media groups in the region By Karlon N. Rama AN INTERNATIONAL…

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Under-coverage of local governments: public officials’ gripes, media’s explanation

  Mayors, mostly of LGUs outside Metro Cebu, complain that their projects and programs have not been publicized by mainstream media. “They send out reporters and news crew to us…

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Godofredo Roperos: A long love affair with writing

In Manila, the almost-four-decade career of Godofredo M. Roperos, 88, covered assignments in reporting, magazine editing, and literary writing. It was interrupted by his work with the government as assistant…

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Cerge Remonde: the ‘probinsyano’ beat reporter who became Press Secretary

He spoke truth to power as a newspaper columnist and radio commentator. But in a reversal of roles, Remonde defended power as press secretary to then president Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo who,…

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Reinventing the newspaper

A series of articles that CJJ hopes will set off a conversation among practitioners and students of journalism as well as media consumers on the crisis that afflicts print media,…

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The hard-hitting radio commentators

Is bombast gone? And do they need to look good on screen too? Bombast and other techniques in the old days of broadcasting are undergoing changes. New technology allows the radio…

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CCPC decries 'toughened' rules on media coverage at House of Representatives

  CEBU CITIZENS-PRESS COUNCIL STATEMENT May 8, 2018 News editors and reporters generally recognize reasonable rules on media coverage to make the flow of information “systematic and orderly.” We are concerned…

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Cyber libel as 'continuing crime'

Why NBI theory in complaint against Rappler might lead to a ‘never-ending’ prescriptive period, which could be used to harass journalists and bloggers  [with additional research by ELIAS L. ESPINOZA] Cyber libel is a continuing crime when the…

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Libel, ‘false’ news now carry stiffer fines

CCPC cautions journalists Libel now carries a higher penalty of fine, from the old rate of P200 to P6,000 to the new rate of P40,000 to P1.2 million. That is…

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Download CJJ digital editions

Cebu Journalism & Journalists (CJJ), founded in 2004, is an annual publication with magazine format. It has both hardcopy and digital editions, with the online edition in two versions: (1)…

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What kind of content will work? A UP forum kicks the idea around

What kind of content works? A panel of UP graduates kicks around ideas for print media It has been some time since observers within the industry and academia noticed that…

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What kind of content works? A panel of UP graduates kicks around ideas for print media

It has been some time since observers within the industry and academia noticed that journalism is facing a crisis.

Solutions have been proposed. But will change in content, particularly in print media, work?

In September 2018, as the Cebu Press Freedom Week celebration was coming to a close, editor-turned university lecturer Jason Baguia sat down with a group of young University of the Philippines graduates from different parts of the country to discuss the matter. Continue Reading

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Remember the newsboys? They may have been forgotten in the age of digital media

Painfully absent in the conversation about how newspapers are transitioning to digital and the evolution of the next printed media product is the erstwhile loud voice of newsboys selling the…

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Painfully absent in the conversation about how newspapers are transitioning to digital and the evolution of the next printed media product is the erstwhile loud voice of newsboys selling the morning edition.

“Mura’g wala nama’y nahinumdom namo (We seem to have been forgotten)” says Francisco Enghug, 47, amid declining newspaper sales in the age of social media and the Internet. “Wa ko kadungog nga dunay gi (I haven’t heard of anyone calling for a) meeting para (for a) solution.”

But media bosses do see a future for the print media industry — one where a re-imagined paper, containing more detailed narratives and catering to a more demanding readership — goes hand-in-hand with news online and in social media. Continue Reading

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The impact of new media on newspaper circulation in selected countries

By Tessa Aguilar In nine countries covered by a study, print media show how to beat the crisis High internet penetration, which makes it easy for the public to get…

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By Tessa Aguilar

In nine countries covered by a study, print media show how to beat the crisis

High internet penetration, which makes it easy for the public to get their news from the web, won’t necessarily cause newspaper circulation to decline.

A common strategy: redesign story-telling based on preferences of readers

This is at least true in nine countries — Australia, Canada, Czech Republic, Finland, Ireland, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore and South Africa — which became the focus of a data-mining and cluster analysis study by a group of college students.

Newspapers here may need to “redesign story telling style based on the preference of the readers” though, said Tessa Frances Aguilar, Christine Dianne, Balansag, Marichu Canencia and Milva Villocero in their paper.

That and continue to raise its online advertising revenues. Continue Reading

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The hard-hitting radio commentators

Is bombast gone? And do they need to look good on screen too? Bombast and other techniques in the old days of broadcasting are undergoing changes. New technology allows the radio…

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Is bombast gone? And do they need to look good on screen too?

Bombast and other techniques in the old days of broadcasting are undergoing changes. New technology allows the radio talk show host not just to be heard but also seen. And engagement with the audience is speedier though there’s less voiced reaction from listeners.

The more telling change in the way radio commentaries are delivered these days is that talk show hosts are not just heard, they’re seen.

But then, in the late eighties going into the nineties, the requirement of voice quality was downgraded too. That was a big change in standards.

Voice timber and diction became less important than capacity to tackle public issues, along with the personality’s overall power to draw the audience.

Some of today’s top radio commentators benefited from devaluation of voice as factor for hiring. Many of them don’t have “the announcer’s voice” prized in the early days of radio. Continue Reading

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Cebu’s top talk show hosts on style, other changes

The raised voice, the fury: Nalzaro is still at it although, he says, his thrust is issue-based, not personality directed. Bañoc thinks the practice has long been abandoned, “if indeed…

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The raised voice, the fury: Nalzaro is still at it although, he says, his thrust is issue-based, not personality directed. Bañoc thinks the practice has long been abandoned, “if indeed it existed.”

Radio commentators are soldiers of the airwaves.

They come armed with opinions and ideas, and their mission is, with voices modulated or not, to infiltrate minds and hearts, and provoke thought on issues of the day.

When successful, their commentaries spark a revolution in the consciousness of listeners and foment in them ideas that depose the empire of apathy.  

To the actual subject of commentary — wayward public servants and others — a broadcaster’s words are bullets that wound the ego. “Toytoy,” “hanggaw,” “kuwanggol” and “amaw” are potent Cebuano adjectives, verbal bombs that form part of a wider arsenal of dark humor.  

But colonizers of the minds and emotions radio commentators are not. Their primary role is to present truths framed on their observation and insight of the current state of affairs.

The ultimate decision on whether to believe the commentator falls on the listener. Continue Reading

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Radio reaches 94% of Metro Cebu

The survey that reports to the Kapisanan ng mga Brodkaster ng Pilipinas claims a radio audience of 1.3 million Cebuanos. Stations dyHP and dySS for AM radio stations and dyWF…

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The survey that reports to the Kapisanan ng mga Brodkaster ng Pilipinas claims a radio audience of 1.3 million Cebuanos. Stations dyHP and dySS for AM radio stations and dyWF and dyRT on the FM band, Kantar Media says, top in audience share. Kantar Media figures give the image of a lopsided competition with one radio station leading the race by miles.

Radio still has a powerful hold on Metro Cebu listeners, a media survey covering the second quarter of 2018 shows.

Kantar Media, in a report to the Kapisanan ng mga Brodkaster ng Pilipinas (KBP), said radio programs in both AM and FM bands reach 94 percent of their sample population of 250 Metro Cebu households every week.

This, based on their computation, represents 1.3 million actual Cebuanos.

The study, commissioned by the Kapisanan ng mga Brodkaster ng Pilipinas (KBP) and carried out from June 21 to 27, 2018 also showed that individuals in Metro Cebu spend an average of three hours a day listening to their favorite programs.

While the version of the Kantar report given to the media does not establish what type of programming  is popular, it does indicate that radio is the foremost mode of information and entertainment for audiences classified as D and E. Continue Reading

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Congress seeks to fix venue of libel to place where community journalist lives, works

Bills now pending in Congress narrow the venue of the filing of libel cases to the place where the journalist lives or works, or where the main office of his…

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The Revised Penal Code requires libel suits to be filed in the Regional Trial Court of the province or city where the libelous article was first published, or where the offended parties lived or worked when the offense was committed. Complainants have filed suit in places far from where community journalists work. SUNSTAR PHOTO

Bills now pending in Congress narrow the venue of the filing of libel cases to the place where the journalist lives or works, or where the main office of his media outfit is located.

House Bill 6916, “An act providing for the venue of the criminal and civil action in libel cases against a community or local journalist, publication or broadcast station,” provides the venue of libel cases against such journalists and media outfits as the “Regional Trial Court of the province or city where the principal office or place of business of the community or local journalist, publication or broadcast station is located.”

The objective of the bill is “to prevent harassment of community or local journalists, publications or broadcast stations.” Continue Reading

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Why CCPC has defined fake news

Legislators need to know that the phrase is also used by some people to refer to errors in editing and reporting and the proposed law might make such errors punishable…

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Legislators need to know that the phrase is also used by some people to refer to errors in editing and reporting and the proposed law might make such errors punishable as a crime. As in libel, where presence of malice is required, errors committed mostly in the rush of deadline cannot be criminal unless made knowingly or maliciously. Otherwise, it would impair the right to free speech and free press.  Continue Reading

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Stopping the police ‘perp walk’

CEBU CITIZENS-PRESS COUNCIL STATEMENT June 17, 2018 The decision of PNP chief Oscar Albayalde to stop parading crime suspects puts back in place the order of then PNP chief Jesus Versoza in…

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CEBU CITIZENS-PRESS COUNCIL STATEMENT
June 17, 2018

The decision of PNP chief Oscar Albayalde to stop parading crime suspects puts back in place the order of then PNP chief Jesus Versoza in 2007 that bans the Philippine equivalent of the U.S.-style “perp walk.” Continue Reading

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The Ador Side: Weak internship, rejection no barrier to achieving national success

Fate shunned Ador Vincent Mayol’s plan to become a priest. Instead, she carved a path for the Mandaue City native toward journalism, which has been his convent for nearly a…

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Fate shunned Ador Vincent Mayol’s plan to become a priest. Instead, she carved a path for the Mandaue City native toward journalism, which has been his convent for nearly a decade.

As a journalist, the low-key University of San Jose-Recoletos alumnus is not obliged to deliver sermons from the pulpit to effect change in society, or prick a reader’s heart.

Mayol spreads journalistic gospels through his reports about real events and genuine people.

The 31-year-old journalist started writing stories and delivering scoops for Cebu Daily News on Sept. 14, 2008, covering several beats—local government units, courts, police offices and the Church.

In the past nine years, his dedication and hard work paid off after several award-giving bodies recognized his works. Continue Reading

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Cyber libel as 'continuing crime'

Libel, ‘false’ news now carry stiffer fines

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