Media Self-regulation through Media Literacy: Insights from the Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC)

Abstract How does the press regulate itself? Through document research, key informant interviews, and participant observation, the researcher studied how the Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC) promotes media self-regulation (MSR) among…

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THE 2019 DILI DIALOGUE FORUM

CCPC attendance at Timor Leste meeting enables it to share, and compare, its experience on press councils with other media groups in the region By Karlon N. Rama AN INTERNATIONAL…

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In his 50s, FCE (1927-2019) showed peers what grit looked like

For many years, alone with his editor while already in his 50s, and with one junior reporter when he was pushing 70, Fred C. Espinoza filled the pages of the…

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CCPC cautions public in assessing “media plot”

“A matrix presented by public officials could lead to something more than a verbal attack from those criticized. In the campaign on illegal drugs, many of those in the matrix…

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Under-coverage of local governments: public officials’ gripes, media’s explanation

  Mayors, mostly of LGUs outside Metro Cebu, complain that their projects and programs have not been publicized by mainstream media. “They send out reporters and news crew to us…

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Godofredo Roperos: A long love affair with writing

In Manila, the almost-four-decade career of Godofredo M. Roperos, 88, covered assignments in reporting, magazine editing, and literary writing. It was interrupted by his work with the government as assistant…

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Cerge Remonde: the ‘probinsyano’ beat reporter who became Press Secretary

He spoke truth to power as a newspaper columnist and radio commentator. But in a reversal of roles, Remonde defended power as press secretary to then president Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo who,…

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Reinventing the newspaper

A series of articles that CJJ hopes will set off a conversation among practitioners and students of journalism as well as media consumers on the crisis that afflicts print media,…

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The hard-hitting radio commentators

Is bombast gone? And do they need to look good on screen too? Bombast and other techniques in the old days of broadcasting are undergoing changes. New technology allows the radio…

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CCPC decries 'toughened' rules on media coverage at House of Representatives

  CEBU CITIZENS-PRESS COUNCIL STATEMENT May 8, 2018 News editors and reporters generally recognize reasonable rules on media coverage to make the flow of information “systematic and orderly.” We are concerned…

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‘Fake news’: undefined in law, bastardized by people like Trump

The existing law on “false news,” under Art. 154 of the Revised Penal Code does not define it. Publishing false news is punishable if it “may endanger the public order…

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The existing law on “false news,” under Art. 154 of the Revised Penal Code does not define it. Publishing false news is punishable if it “may endanger the public order or cause damage to the interest or credit of the State.” Nothing about what “false news” is.

Senate Bill 1492, filed last July 21 by Sen. Joel Villanueva, like the penal code provision, merely describes the potential harm of false/fake news: (1) if it tends “to cause panic, division, chaos, violence or hate” or (2) if it “exhibits or tends to exhibit propaganda to blacken or discredit the reputation of a person…” Continue Reading

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‘Fake news’: undefined in law, bastardized by people like Trump

The existing law on “false news,” under Art. 154 of the Revised Penal Code does not define it. Publishing false news is punishable if it “may endanger the public order…

Continue Reading

The existing law on “false news,” under Art. 154 of the Revised Penal Code does not define it. Publishing false news is punishable if it “may endanger the public order or cause damage to the interest or credit of the State.” Nothing about what “false news” is. 

Senate Bill 1492, filed last July 21 by Sen. Joel Villanueva, like the penal code provision, merely describes the potential harm of false/fake news: (1) if it tends “to cause panic, division, chaos, violence or hate” or (2) if it “exhibits or tends to exhibit propaganda to blacken or discredit the reputation of a person…” Continue Reading

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Libel, ‘false’ news now carry stiffer fines

CCPC cautions journalists Libel now carries a higher penalty of fine, from the old rate of P200 to P6,000 to the new rate of P40,000 to P1.2 million. That is…

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CCPC cautions journalists

Libel now carries a higher penalty of fine, from the old rate of P200 to P6,000 to the new rate of P40,000 to P1.2 million.

That is the change that stands out under Republic Act 10951, which adjusted among others the fines imposed under the Revised Penal Code. The Senate bill authored by Sen. Franklin Drilon was signed into law by President Duterte last Aug. 29. Continue Reading

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Still photos in the age of the video

Can photojournalism stay relevant? In the darkened highway illuminated by the headlights of cars, a bystander was quietly documenting on his smartphone two young men confronting each other over a…

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Can photojournalism stay relevant?

In the darkened highway illuminated by the headlights of cars, a bystander was quietly documenting on his smartphone two young men confronting each other over a traffic issue. After some heated exchange of words, one took a gun and fired at the other person. Pandemonium ensued. In a matter of seconds, the video was downloaded on Facebook. And before the night was over, the video had gone viral.

Welcome to the brave new world of instantaneous sharing of information! And as a photographer, you can’t help but ask, can photography keep pace with the new media world order?

Photography, as we knew it, has recently gone through a dramatic and decidedly major makeover. The shift from film to digital is earth-shaking. The transition is ushered in by the entry of a brand-new technology which redefined how photographs are produced and shared. The new technology attracted a younger and more numerous band of practitioners who are in a mad dash to take over the castle. As in any revolution, there are casualties. Kodak, the iconic company whose name is synonymous to photography, is its biggest victim. Then there are the smaller and largely unaccounted photo entities that folded shop. And in the vast wasteland are older photographers who stubbornly refuse to follow the beat of the new drum, preferring to stick around in the old terminal and dreaming of the past. Continue Reading

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Of readership and citizenship: A library’s tale

When I heard about the Cebu Citizens-Press Council’s (CCPC) call for book donations for its Cebu Journalism and Journalists (CJJ) Book project, I thought how history has a way of…

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When I heard about the Cebu Citizens-Press Council’s (CCPC) call for book donations for its Cebu Journalism and Journalists (CJJ) Book project, I thought how history has a way of coming full circle.

During the 45th quarterly meeting of the CCPC on Dec. 1, 2016, the country’s longest active citizens-press council entered into a memorandum of agreement with the Cebu City Public Library (CCPL) to gather journalism books and related materials for a nook at the library, located at the ground floor of the Rizal Memorial Library and Museum.

Book shelves were donated to the CCPL, including 230 books on journalism coming from SunStar Cebu and its public and standards editor Pachico A. Seares, who is also the CCPC executive director. Continue Reading

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Cebu Citizens-Press Council: Reaching out

We do a lot of consulting. Before CCPC speaks out. Consultation is the core of CCPC’s work: as forum for media issues, platform for grievance, advocate of free speech and…

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We do a lot of consulting. Before CCPC speaks out.

Consultation is the core of CCPC’s work: as forum for media issues, platform for grievance, advocate of free speech and free press, and catalyst for journalists’ welfare.

The Cebu press doesn’t isolate itself within its media platforms. With its citizen partners, the press reaches out and listens. Person-to-person, up close, in forums outside of the newspaper or broadcast station and its vehicle. Continue Reading

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Frontliners: what sometimes happen behind the scene

On the scene reporters descend, piecing together narratives for their audiences like clockwork. Except there is nothing regular at all about the job of reporting the news. Unfamiliar territory, jargon,…

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On the scene reporters descend, piecing together narratives for their audiences like clockwork. Except there is nothing regular at all about the job of reporting the news. Unfamiliar territory, jargon, security threats, disturbing vistas—here’s a behind-the-scenes look at the challenges news gatherers face. Continue Reading

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Cebu Press Freedom Week timeline

The celebration of Cebu Press Freedom Week aims to remind the public and the press that the freedom they enjoy must be protected from all threats. The celebration brings together…

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The celebration of Cebu Press Freedom Week aims to remind the public and the press that the freedom they enjoy must be protected from all threats. The celebration brings together not just Cebu journalists but also members of the public invited to activities that range from forums and training sessions to photo exhibits and fellowship.

The Cebu Press Freedom Week Inc. board of trustees lays down the policies on the management of the weeklong celebration. Continue Reading

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New bosses in the newsroom

No day off, reporting in three languages—these new leaders of the newsroom meet challenges head on while keeping the troops happy and in line. Still “one of the boys,” but…

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No day off, reporting in three languages—these new leaders of the newsroom meet challenges head on while keeping the troops happy and in line. Still “one of the boys,” but they now make the rules.

Archie Mangubat Modequillo

The Freeman editor-in-chief Archie M. Modequillo considers the readers’ shift toward social media as the paper’s biggest challenge. He wants a change in the paper’s culture to rise to the new challenge, and is confident this can be achieved with everyone’s cooperation in “improving content and adapting new technologies—even if slowly but consistently.”

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Jess Vestil: ‘Renaissance man’

Journalist, publicist, advertising executive—Jess Perez Vestil was all that. Plus teacher, actor and poet besides. Vestil’s love for his mother language and country gave birth to “Yutang Tabunon,” the Cebuano…

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Journalist, publicist, advertising executive—Jess Perez Vestil was all that. Plus teacher, actor and poet besides.

Vestil’s love for his mother language and country gave birth to “Yutang Tabunon,” the Cebuano translation of the Philippine national anthem.

The late multi-talented journalist answered the call of then Cebu Gov. Emilio Osmeña, who sought the Cebuano version of “Lupang Hinirang.” Continue Reading

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Cyber libel as 'continuing crime'

Libel, ‘false’ news now carry stiffer fines

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